‘SIXTEEN’ – A Nationwide photography group project. UK.

‘Sixteen’ as a project is borne out of a series of pictures I made with young people during the Scottish Independence Referendum. As a Scotsman living in England, I had no vote and so as a way of engaging with the debate I made a series of photographs of young people who would celebrate their sixteenth birthday on the day of the vote, 18th September 2014. They were the youngest people ever to vote in a UK election and I was encouraged by how engaged they were in the discussions and how seriously they took their responsibilities.

The project got me thinking about the decisions that sixteen year olds make and the opportunities available to them. It is usually the time when you are approaching final secondary school exams and deciding whether to continue in education to study for A-levels or higher qualifications or to leave school and start to make your own way in an uncertain world. At a time when my own daughter was sixteen, it felt like the first time that most people are presented with really important life decisions and I was interested in how different people from different walks of life approached those decisions. How culture, social background, location, gender, ethnicity, family etc all influence what young people think they can achieve in life and the paths they feel that they can take.

I started making more portraits of sixteen year olds in and around the north west of England and in this case asking them to write about themselves, their dreams, ambitions and fears both for their own futures and the future of the world more widely. At an age of personal transition and a time of great uncertainty in the economy, national and international affairs, environmental concerns etc., I was interested to explore the outlook of the next generation - the first social media generation - faced with a Brexit that none of them were old enough to vote for or against. In many cases theirs feels like a much more challenging future than the previous generations as technology and industry change the economy.

Shooting those first few pictures, I realised that I was interested in exploring the experiences and aspirations of sixteen year olds much more widely and so I invited a few friends and colleagues to discuss the idea of making it a group project. I am delighted to say that they all bought into the concept and over a pint of two in a north London pub everyone chipped in with great enthusiasm bringing in their own ideas and their own particular interests and proposals for different ways of working. I felt that as a group, we could really delve into the subject in some depth, exploring the experiences of young people far and wide – it was exciting, but it was going to need a lot of research, preparation, discussion etc to get it off the ground.

That’s were it all started and so before I talk a little bit about the areas I personally will working in, I just want to say a big thank you to all the photographers who have agreed to take part. It’s both a privilege and an honour to be working alongside great friends and colleagues whose work I admire.

In no particular order: Jillian Edelstein, Kalpesh Lathigra, Lottie Davies, Simon Roberts, Sophie Gerrard, Stuart Freedman, Kate Peters, Roy Mehta, Abbie Trayler-Smith, Antonio Olmos, Linda Brownlee, Christopher Nunn, Michelle Sank, Ronan McKenzie, Kate Kirkwood and Simon Wheatley.

So now I am excited that it is all coming together and really looking forward to seeing the work as it starts to take shape in 2018.

Since those initial informal meetings, it’s been a long road to get to this stage, and with the invaluable support of producer Liz Wewiora and creative director Anne Braybon, we are now seeing some real progress as each photographer starts to explore their own themes within the wider project.

Each of us is approaching the project in our own way finding different creative avenues to explore, but always in a collaborative fashion with the sixteen year olds we are choosing to work with. For my part I am concentrating on two themes, both close to my heart. I will be working in island communities around the UK, continuing in the same vein with which I started this project working on a large format film camera and asking each sitter to present their testimony in a hand written text alongside the photograph. I’m looking forward to working with schools and youth groups in some very interesting communities in the Western Isles, Orkney, Shetland, the Channel Islands and elsewhere.

The second strand of the project for me is looking at the post-industrial communities in the North of England and beyond. I’m interested to explore towns and cities that once relied on one main industry: mining, shipbuilding, textile weaving, steel and chemical manufacture etc, and learn how the experience of young people in those communities today may differ, for better or worse, from the experience of previous generations.

The project has received an initial research and development grant from Arts Council England, and we have been working with schools, youth groups, parents and others to get feedback on the project ideas and how we might involve the young people in the process. Each photographer has her or his own interests and each of us is working closely with Anne to find new ways to present the views of sixteen year olds in words and pictures. We are variously working in stills and video with spoken word audio, handwritten texts and social media messaging.

I look forward to sharing some of my own work and that of my colleagues in the coming months and building an online community exploring what it means to be sixteen in Britain today.

If you would like to know more about the project at this stage, please drop me an email or connect via Facebook etc. and I'll add you to the emailing list for updates

A project website/blog will be launched in the coming months where you can keep up to date with work-in-progress, written contributions by all the photographers and behind-the-scenes pictures etc. but rather than show any of that now, whilst we are just starting out... here's a pic of tow of those first images on show at The National Portrait Gallery in London until 4th Feb.

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NEW REPRESENTATION IN USA

New Year, New News.... I'm thrilled to announce that I've teamed up with the lovely team at Greenhouse Reps as my sole representatives in the USA. Looking forward to a long and creative partnership.

Please contact Robin, Gary or Christine for any enquiries:

Greenhouse Reps NYC 
tel: +1 212 704 4300 
Robin Dictenberg: +1 917 410 7646
Gary Hurewitz:  +1 917 410 7678
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greenhouse_web

Day Trippers

The 7th of July this year marks the 60th anniversary of the Woolton Church Summer Fete in Liverpool where a young John Lennon was introduced to an even younger Paul McCartney for the first time. That meeting has gone down in musical folklore leading to one of the most extraordinary writing partnerships that changed the face of modern music. Now, sixty years on, I’m interested in the relationship of the Beatles to this small part of south Liverpool - just a few streets. I am taken by the idea that tourists travel from all over the world to visit such ordinary suburban streets leading to the somewhat incongruous sight of international day trippers rubbing shoulders with locals in very un-touristy locations.

Often they have travelled from far and wide for a once in a lifetime visit to the UK: they take in Buckingham Palace, Stonehenge, Edinburgh Castle and a few run down streets of council housing in Liverpool!

Having grown up in Liverpool, I’m intrigued by the power the band still has to attract people from far and wide and how the locals just go about their business semi-oblivious to the daily invasion.

In Arnold Grove in particular, where George Harrison grew up, the house is still occupied by an elderly lady - every day hoards of tourists walk past children playing in the street, as George would have done, to have their picture taken outside her house and sometimes peer in through her windows. In Madryn Street, Ringo Starr’s home, all the houses are now boarded up and visitors come to write on the metal shutters and sometimes to dance!

The Magical Mystery Tour bus passes Madryn St. the childhood home of Ringo Starreaston_beatles_01

Magical Mystery Tour bus tourists (on the pavement) and National Trust visitors (in the garden) of 20, Forthlin Road, the childhood home of Paul McCartney.easton_beatles_02

Canadian Tourists at Forthlin Road.easton_beatles_03

Forthlin Roadeaston_beatles_04

Spanish tourists at 'Mendips', the childhood home of John Lennon.easton_beatles_05

A 'selfie' for the Magical Mystery Tour at the gates of Strawberry Fields.easton_beatles_06

"Behind the shelter in the middle of the roundabout", the Magical Mystery Tour passes the  'barber' and the 'bank' at the top of Penny Lane.easton_beatles_07

"In Penny Lane, there is a barber showing photographs"easton_beatles_08

A group of German tourists dancing outside the former home of Ringo Starr. Madryn Street in Dingle is one of 'The Welsh Streets', traditional Liverpool terraces, now all boarded up and awaiting a council decision on whether to demolish or refurbish.easton_beatles_09

A busload of tourists descend on the tiny cul-de-sac Arnold Grove where George Harrison lived as a young boy. The house and those surrounding it are still lived in and each day residents tolerate a stream of visitors from all around the world.easton_beatles_10

FC Barcelona Photography Awards

I'm delighted to announce that my photograph 'Arshia Ghorbani, 16, Toxteth, Liverpool' has won first prize in the inaugural FC Barcelona Photo Awards. The awards were set up to "celebrate the positive intrinsic values common to sport and culture and to communicate the importance and contribution of those values to current society." Arshia’s story is an example of the power of sport in society and a testament to the kind of community spirit that I experience all around the world and especially in Liverpool. It is that spirit of humanity, of welcoming and of togetherness that so enriches our society and must, in the end, prevail over those that spread hate and isolationism.

Arshia is an asylum seeker from Iran now living in Liverpool while he waits for his refugee status to be assessed. As a teenager he has many challenges to face to fit into a new community and new society, not least the challenge of learning a new language and continuing his education in a strange environment. The first thing he did when he came to Liverpool was play football as a way to make new friends and feel accepted. He plays for Kingsley United in Toxteth, known as Liverpool's 'most diverse' football team. He is sixteen years old and tells his story in his own words: he has written his testimony/caption in his native language: Farsi.

An English translation follows:

Hello My name is Arshia Ghorbani and I was born in 01.02.2000. That means that I am 16 years old now. I’m happy person normally but sometimes I can get angry as well. The only thing that I do cheerfully and lovingly is football. I started playing football with an adult team since I was 8 years old which made me good progress in football. I have a lot of plans and dreams, too many!! I like go to school and learning. I really enjoyed of my school and it’s lovely staff and never want to leave the school. I know that all people can’t reach they dreams. It is difficult and hard work to access my dreams. To be a surgeon doctor is one of my main aims. I am good at learning and understanding in school. My first language is one of my main barriers between me and my dreams. It is now just 3 years that I am living in UK, but even now I can’t understand some of the written words; on the other hand I can speak English very well. One of my other problems is that we can’t go on holiday, we are not allowed to travel, we can’t buy a car even if we had the money, as my Dad is not allowed to get a licence, and we don’t have permission for work. That all means we can’t make any decision for our future because we are asylum seekers. That all makes a teenage boy like me to be in desperation and stressful which is not good at my age. Unfortunately I can’t go to university because I am asylum seeker. I know it’s not the UK government fault, but if we think I had potential to be a doctor in future and I could save hundreds of humans lives. I like to help people and made smile on their face who poor and need help. That is the thing other people do for me when I was in need. Anyway I keep going on with the hope and the stress. I don’t let any problem keep me away from my dreams. I can’t and don’t want to make blame on my family or anyone for the situation I have. You must know that nothing is reached easily in the life and you must try hard. If it was easy everyone would be happy and joyful.

https://photoawards.fcbarcelona.com/winfoto/?lang=en

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This photograph is part of my early work on a group project I am leading with fifteen other photographers all around the UK. The project 'Sixteen' looks at the experience, ambitions, dreams, hopes and fears of sixteen year olds from all walks of life all around the country.

A large format C-type print measuring 150cm x 94cm will be unveiled at the awards ceremony and exhibition to be held in Barcelona in June.

 

Joan Eardley: A Sense of Place

Just back from a trip to Edinburgh to see a very special show.
Joan Eardley has fascinated, inspired and influenced me profoundly since I first came across her work at Aberdeen Art Gallery many, many years ago. Like me she was drawn again and again to what appear, at first, to be two very different subjects: social documentary (in Eardley’s case of inner city Glasgow) and wild landscape (North East Scottish coast).
So excited then to see the first major show of her work in a long time at The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh.
Much of the work on show is familiar from Christopher Andreae’s comprehensive 2013 book, but even then there are some surprises and, as ever, seeing paintings (and drawings, sketches and photographs) ‘in the flesh’ is revelatory compared with reproductions in books. 
The beautiful ‘Boats on the Shore’, 1963 (see attached) was completely new to me and whilst the exhibition is full of wonderful paintings any show is necessarily selective so if you want to see the monumental ‘High Tide, A Winter Afternoon’, 1961, you’ll still need to head up to Aberdeen. Of course that means you can pop in to Catterline en route and see the place that inspired so much of Eardley’s landscapes and seascapes.
The show is divided roughly between the two great strands of her work, the street children and tenements of 1950s Glasgow and the remote fishing village of Catterline on the East Aberdeenshire coast. 
Here then is a little taster….
....and my own (heavily influenced) picture of the Todhead lighthouse from Catterline made a few years back - part of the series 'Dreich'
 
https://www.nationalgalleries.org/whatson/on-now-coming-soon/joan-eardley/
http://www.aagm.co.uk/thecollections/objects/object/High-Tide-A-Winter-Afternoon?l
img_4799Eardley, Joan Kathleen Harding, 1921-1963; High Tide, a Winter Afternoongma-853todehead_from_catterline_2013

Travel Photographer of the Year Awards 2016

Delighted and honoured to win the Portfolio award for 'Natural World' in the Travel Photographer of the Year last week. The portfolio of four pictures is taken from my ongoing personal project 'The Lake' - you can see a wider selection from the project on the website: craigeaston.com > travel and landscape series > The Lake.

What the judges said: "Craig's images caught the eye of the judges in the earlier online rounds of the judging but it was only when they saw the sumptuous tones and detail in the prints that their true beauty and quality was fully appreciated."

The prints will be exhibited as part of the TPOTY exhibitions to be held in 2017:

Hull, City of Culture, 18th May - 30th June

Greenwich, London, 4th August - 3rd September

 

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The Tay Valley, Scotland

Amidst all the turmoil surrounding the EU referendum here in the UK last week, I was fortunate to spend a few days up in Scotland continuing my series of large format landscapes. This time The Upper Tay Valley in and around Crianlarich....

With 04.30 sunrise and sunset at 22.30, they were long days. Thanks to the good folk at the Crianlarich Hotel who looked after me with my odd time keeping!

A pint of the Colonsay Brewery IPA was a welcome treat at the end of the day...

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International Color Awards

Delighted to receive the news this morning that my picture 'Mr & Mrs McDonald, Scotland' has been selected at the International Color Awards in Los Angeles. Shot on a 1952 Deardorff in June last year as part of an ongoing series entitled '900 Miles'. color awards copy

The Independent Newspaper

It was with great sadness that I heard the announcement recently that The Independent was to cease it's print edition from March 26th this year after setting the agenda and setting the bar in British journalism for 30 years. I began my career at 'The Indy' back in 1990 and it was there alongside the best newspaper photographers of the day that I learned my trade. Great photographers like Brian Harris (book coming soon, about which I will blog I'm sure), John Voos, Glynn Griffiths, Tom Pilston, David Rose all on the staff back then (remember when newspapers had staff photographers?) and sports guys David Ashdown and Peter Jay. Alongside them was a great bunch of regular freelancers: Nick Turpin, Ed Sykes, Peter Macdiarmid, Laurie Lewis, Geraint Lewis, Herbie Knott, Steve Morgan, Robert Hallam, and then later Ed Webb, Kalpesh Lathigra, Kayte Brimacombe, Andrew Buurman etc. More followed after I left too.

I will be forever grateful for what I learned from each and all of them and proud to call many of them friends to this day.

Picture editors and darkroom staff too: Chris McCane, Keith Dobney, David Swanborough, Mike Spillard, Victoria Lukens, Susan Glenn, Karen Wylie, Colin Jacobson, John Luff, Sophie Batterbury, Simon Van Covoerden, Tony Buckingham etc.

Apologies to anyone I've missed off.

Here's a few pictures from back in the day.....

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The death of Francis Bacon, Colony Room, Soho, LondonColony Rooms copy

Ben Okri, authorBen Okri

Michael Heseltine, Conservative Party Conference, Blackpooleaston_heseltine

David Hockney, on the set of 'The Rakes Progress', Saddlers Wells, LondonDavid Hockney on the set of The Rakes Progress Opera, which he d

Miners Welfare Rally, Londoneaston_whose_job

Liberia, West AfricaLiberia_colour_01-02

War in the former Yugoslavia (Mrs Thatcher)Mrs T 4_flat

Nelson Mandela, LondonNelson Mandela

Sealed Knot, Civil War reenactment, NewburyNewbury Down

La Defense, ParisParis_Indy

Ted Heath, Westminster, LondonTed Heath interview

Armistice Day, Ypres, BelgiumYpres

 

Myanmar

Back from a fascinating trip to Myanmar in December. Amazing country, lovely people and a privilege to have the opportunity to work there. A longer blog post will follow with the commissioned pictures once they have been used by the client, but here's a little taster...easton_myanmar_01easton_myanmar_02 copyeaston_myanmar_03easton_myanmar_04easton_myanmar_05easton_myanmar_06easton_myanmar_07easton_myanmar_08

New prints

Just packaged up and sent a new series of five prints to a client in the US. All 30"x25" c-type prints, edition of 8. Giant Sequoia, Redwood National Park, California. easton_8927easton_8933easton_8944easton_8957easton_8929

Mary Ellen Mark

And so we must say goodbye and thank you to Mary Ellen Mark, one of the giants of compassionate and concerned photography and an inspiration to me and countless others. Mary Ellen Mark's work for me has always been a standard by which all great documentary photography can be judged: engaged and engaging, compassionate but objective, the stories she sought to tell were always captivating and her ability to get 'under the skin' of each subject was startling. Whilst the stories were often hard hitting and difficult, the photographs were always direct and to the point, beautifully seen without any need for trickery or unnecessary complexity. From the raw honesty of Ward 81, Falkland Road and Streetwise to the joyfulness of Indian Circus and her commercial film stills right up to the exquisite 20/24 polaroid portraits of 'Twins' and 'Prom'

One of the true greats has gone and will be sorely missed, but we must say thank you for all the extraordinary photographs she has left behind and for the flame that she lit in so many younger photographers of my generation and beyond.

Here's a tiny reminder.....

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On documentary photography and some current exhibitions

There’s certainly some good photography around in the UK just now. Especially if you can get a little bit off the beaten track. I had the pleasure last week to go to the opening of ‘Landscapes of Murder’ by Antonio Olmos at Rich Mix in London: a poignant and powerful reminder of the problem of violence in London. The work is presented as a series of landscapes of everyday places and street scenes: ordinary, familiar and unremarkable locations that serve only to heighten the tragedy that has happened in each. Reminiscent, of course, of Joel Sternfeld’s work ‘On this site: landscapes in memoriam’, Olmos photographed the site of every one of the 210 murders that took place in London from 1st January 2011 to 31st December 2012. One telling difference between the two series is that as a news and documentary photographer Olmos visited each site very shortly after the murder took place: after the media had left, but whilst emotions were still raw. Here we have lone bunches of withering flowers, torn remnants of ‘Police: do not cross’ tape, groups of once tough looking teenagers drawn together in their grief all amidst shoppers and motorists going about their daily lives. Life goes on in these landscapes, but there is always a disturbing reminder that life has been lost here too.

It is the very ordinariness of each photograph that makes them all the more shocking: a powerful and fitting expression of the senselessness of murder on the streets of London.

Friends of Negus McClean gather near the spot where he was murdered on Sunday Night. McLean was stabbed to death by a gang of youths on Westminster Road in Edmonton, North London. McLean is the 4th teenager to be stabbed to death in London in 2011.

At Rich Mix, London until 30th May: http://www.richmix.org.uk/whats-on/event/the-landscape-of-murder/

Book available here.

On a connected theme as part of the Look/15 photography festival in Liverpool is American photographer Richard Ross’s heartbreaking series ‘Juvenile in Justice’: a compassionate and powerful portrayal of a justice system that has gone very, very wrong. Ross has photographed teenagers and young people (as young as ten!) held in detention centres in 31 US states. In each photograph the face of the youngster is blurred, obscured or photographed from behind, magnifying the sense of isolation and fear they must feel. Accompanying texts in the young persons own words are desperate.

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Both extraordinary and important bodies of work – documentary photography at it’s very best.

I fear sometimes that photographers can get too obsessed with the ‘idea’ or ‘concept’ of what they are doing or otherwise overplay the process – photography about photography. There seems to be a lot of naval gazing going on these days.

If, as photographers, we want to document and communicate, then surely we want our work to reach and connect with as wide an audience as possible. If we require that the viewer has a degree in visual anthropology or is extraordinarily well informed about the latest movements in contemporary art then we may be doing our subjects a great disservice. This is not to say that documentary, art and conceptualization can’t all work together and there are some fantastic examples of new and innovative approaches to what is essentially documentary photography where the results are challenging, engaging and very rewarding. I’m thinking here of Max Pinckers’ work ‘Will They Sing like Raindrops or Leave me Thirsty’, a small selection of which is at St Georges Hall in Liverpool as part of Look/15. The work is a mesmerising mix of Bollywood theatricality and keenly observed documentary interwoven with old torn newspaper cuttings - all telling the story of the ‘Love Commandos’, a small group of men in New Delhi whose mission is ‘to help India’s lovebirds who want to marry for love’, often against the wishes of family and the tradition of arranged marriage. A fine piece of work and well worth looking out.

Another compelling work that uses differing approaches is the intensely personal series ‘When I was six’ by Phil Toledano which was shown recently at the Format Festival in Derby and is available as a book from Dewi Lewis. The title refers to the death of Toledano’s sister aged nine when the photographer himself was six. Many years later after his parents died, Toledano discovered a box of his sisters possessions that his parents had neatly packed away after her death. The work takes the form of a series of still lives of items from the box and imagined ‘landscapes’ of outer space that occupied the young boys mind in the years after her death. Beautiful!

So, there it is: a very small selection of some great work that's out there just now. There are myriad ways of making powerful documentary work, but please, please, please, make it both accessible and compelling.

I'll finish with some words from Michael Craig-Martin, the great cheerleader for conceptual art and the Young British Artists. In his new book 'On being an Artist' he writes:

"I dislike jargon intensely and cannot stand people who think that complex ideas need to be expressed in a way that is obscure or rarefied. I believe the opposite is the case."

Here, here.

Heathrow Airport Campaign for Saatchi Masius, London

New work for Heathrow Airport, all shot on cold and blustery late winter days in UK! Brrrr. Commissioned by Saatchi Masius London

Many thanks to all the participants who braved the cold, the mud, the wind and the rain: Louis Barnett (Chocolatier), Martin Corr (Sound Moves), Paul Brown (MHI, Bristol), Anna Goodband (Liverpool School of English), Chris Baker-Brian (BBOXX), plus of course my super assistants Wayne Pilgrim, Peter Scarratt, Anderson Lamb.

Art Directors: Ian Otway/Tom Kennedy

Copywriters: Richard Carman/Laura Fullerton

Production: Sharon Daly/Luke Jackson

Post Production: Michel Groot/Craig Easton

Liverpool-School-of-English-ad2 louis-barnett-chocolate-ad_dps sound-moves-ad_02 BBOXX_ad_dps mail-handling-advert_dps_02

For behind the scenes videos by Barney Edwards/Kalectiv please visit:

http://your.heathrow.com/soundmovesuk/

http://your.heathrow.com/bboxx/

http://your.heathrow.com/lse/

http://your.heathrow.com/louisbarnett/

http://your.heathrow.com/mailhandlinginternational/

 

Game of Thrones

Been shooting some landscape work around Game of Thrones locations in Northern Ireland. Mostly using PhaseOne kit, but fortunately for this one I was using an old Nikon D3X - they take some battering those cameras!!! Ballintoy Harbour, Co. Antrim....

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and half a second later....
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more to follow....